PROCURED OR RECOGNIZED BY:

  • US Department of Defense
  • Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical and Biological Defense
  • Other military services since 2002

CERTIFIED BY:

  • US Department of Homeland Security, SAFETY Act

CLEARED BY:

  • US Food and Drug Administration
  • Health Canada
  • Australian Therapeutics Goods Administration
  • Israel Ministry of Health
  • RSDL Kit is CE-marked
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The Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion Kit is intended to remove or neutralize chemical warfare agents and T-2 Toxin from the skin.

Selected Important Safety Information
For external use. Avoid prolonged skin contact. Remove RSDL with water when conditions permit. See full Important Safety Information below.

The Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion Kit is intended to remove or neutralize chemical warfare agents and T-2 Toxin from the skin.

Selected Important Safety Information
For external use. Avoid prolonged skin contact. Remove RSDL with water when conditions permit. See full Important Safety Information below.

According to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), chemical weapons refer to “any toxic chemical or its precursor that can cause death, injury, temporary incapacitation or sensory irritation through its chemical action.”

the chemical warfare threat

Blister agents

(or vesicants)

Nerve agents

History of Chemical Warfare1

The use of chemical weapons has caused an estimated one million deaths throughout the world in the past century alone, since the time they were first deployed in modern warfare during World War I.2 Though the Geneva Protocol banning the use of chemical weapons was signed in 1925, many nations and groups continued to develop, produce, and stockpile chemical weapons. This activity escalated further during the Cold War and became a major area of concern for world leaders and the United Nations. Although substantial progress has been made in addressing chemical weapon threats, recent activity underscores the need for vigilance and preparedness against chemical attacks.

Visit the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW)
For more background and history of chemical warfare.

Recent Chemical Warfare Events3

1994

Sarin used in poisoning incident in Matsumoto, a Japanese community, perpetrated by the Aum Shinrikyu doomsday cult

Sarin released in Tokyo subway, also perpetrated by Aum Shinrikyu

1995

Iraq uses mustard gas and other nerve agents against Kurdish residents in Northern Iraq

1998

Reports of sulfur mustard, chlorine gas, and other chemical weapons used in Syria in multiple attacks across various regions

2012-2017

February 13, 2017: Binary method
administration of VX used to assassinate Kim Jong-nam, half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un

April 4, 2017: Sarin gas used in Syria’s northern Idlib province, killing dozens

1. Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons. (n.d.). Chemical Weapons Convention: Genesis and Historical Development. Retrieved April 27, 2017, from https://www.opcw.org/chemical-weapons-convention/genesis-and-historical-development/.

2. United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs. (n.d.). Chemical Weapons. Retrieved April 17, 2017, from https://www.un.org/disarmament/wmd/chemical/.

3. Szinicz, L. (2005). History of chemical and biological warfare agents. Toxicology, 167-181.